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witt" starts now. >>> almost nowhere. that's the words from the gop on fiscal cliff talks. but exactly where is that? and how will congress and the white house get somewhere? >>> the tug-of-war in the middle east. some new wrinkles that beg the question, is any resolution in sight for israel and the palestinians? >>> unsolved mystery. that huge powerball jackpot raised some unanswered questions beyond who won. >>> having their cupcake and eating it, too. big new twist in the hostess going out of business story. good morning, everyone. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." let's get to what's happening right now out there. there is new intrigue in the fight over the fiscal cliff talks today. both sides have messages out this morning that seem to echo the same old position. this on the heels of president obama holding a campaign-style event in suburban philadelphia to sell his solution. he said if congress does not extend the bush tax cuts for the middle class, everyone's taxes will go up january 1st. >> i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. that's sort of like the lump of coa
of the fiscal cliff talks. yesterday, the president suggested the tax changes now can be done and spending changes next year and the republicans say, not so were. second, a phone call teen the -- between the president and speaker boehner and carney said the president laid out any deal has to have an increase in tax rates but he would not be specific suggesting there is flexibility. the top rate does nut have to be 39.6 back from clinton, but something to get a deal jump started. mitt romney was here for lunch the first meeting since after the election and it was awkward and the menu included turkey chili and a white house readout said they promised to "keep in touch" if the opportunity arises where their interests intersect, maybe another way of saying not so much. >>neil: turkey chili. >>guest: healthy. >>neil: it is. and you are healthy. they are not close to a deal? they aren't close to a deal? what is the deal? we don't know. when we get a deal, and they will, it will be because of something we don't see, not something we did see. ask any sports agent, many negotiations have turned on
correspondent mike viqueira. what can you make of this? fiscal cliff talks are they a nonstarter? >> i tell you, you listen to everything that is being said publicly. you see the president there. it's clear that the election, yes, is over. but the campaign goes on here. you know, i really believe that there two things that are clear from the white house to republicans. we are still in preliminary stages here, which is the good news, considering they are far apart. number two, the white house clearly feels it has the upper hand. it came with the $1.6 billion in new revenues and that's twice what the president was talking about before the election. republicans, obviously, rejecting it out of hand. we all heard by now republican leader in the senate mitch mcconnell laughed at it. there you see some of the provisions there. $600 billion in savings. some of it from medicare, another 50 billion in spending and new spending on infrastructure and stimulus spending. that's something that republicans aren't going to want to go to. the two sides are far apart. here we are on december 1st, the clock is tic
: as the country fast approaches the fiscal cliff, the two sides are talking past each other. democrats say they've laid down their marker hiking tax rates on wealthier americans. and it's up to republicans to propose specific spending cuts they want to entitlement programs. however, republicans say they've offered a concession putting revenue on the table. and they say it's now up to the president and his fellow democrats to feel some pain and propose cuts in medicare and medicaid. confu confusing? we asked senate majority leader harry reid. where's the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain. so you should ask him, okay. >> from capitol hill to the white house, democrats say the major hurdle remains, the tax issue, whether republicans will agree not just to revenue but to raising tax rates. republicans as you will not be surprised have made clear so far that is a no-go. so what's next? well, a top republican aide told me they look forward to hearing from the white house. a top democratic aide saying, our door is open. read that, wolf, as a standstill. >> they've waited a few weeks before a
discussion of the fiscal cliff, given that is what lawmakers are talking about now. mitt romney just arrived here. we're not expecting anything huge to come out of this meeting. no appointment. for example, to the cabinet. but the president certainly, i think, hoping to engage in a serious conversation. this, as you point out, will be just the seventh time that these two have sat down after what was really a bruising fight during the election. this is really about sort of striking a tone of bipartisanship, helping these two former rivals to bury the hatchet but helping, i think the country to move forward, especially as we get closer to that fiscal cliff deadline. >> and ruth is here at the table. one of the issues could be the sort of backdrop the post-election comment by all sides not only mitt romney but also by stewart stevenson, op-ed his adviser. there was a time not long ago when the problems of the democratic party revolved arounding too liberal and dependent on minorities. obama turned those problems in advantages and rode that strategy to victory but he was a charismatic african-am
. if the fiscal cliff hits and nothing changes. as you go and look at the first group of folks here, talk about people who make very little money, up to $20,000 or $20,000 to $40,000. this yellow part represents the current amount of taxes folks are paying out there. if the fiscal cliff hits and nothing changes, this group would pay about $400 more. this group down here would pay about $1,200 more. that doesn't seem like a whether or not he will lot of money, but against that kind of income it's pretty big. move to the next category. if you go to $40,000 to $64,000 in income or $64,000 to $108,000, you see the green area's much bigger. that's because there are a lot of taxpayers like this. and they're paying a fairly sizable amount. but if they're out there and the fiscal cliff goes all the way through and nothing stops it, look what's going to happen. almost $2,000 more for this group. that's what you would have to pay if you're in that group. and look down here at the other one down here, $64,000 to $108,000, $3,500 more on that. and as you move up it gets even more so. go to this group, peop
. >> this week on "inside washington," heading towards the fiscal cliff. who is going to blink first? >> nobody can win everything. the republicans will have to give on revenue, democrats will have to give on entitlement reform. >> susan rice still in the bull's-eye. >> the concerns i have are greater today than before. >> lunch at the white house whitemitt. who will dare to break the no tax hike pledge? >> republicans who voted against the no tax hike pledged damage the brand for everyone else. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> thomas jefferson said the purpose of government is to enable the people of the nation to live in safety and happiness. jefferson said americans would be ok if they could keep the government from wasting their labors under the pretense of taking care of them. what is your government doing for you today? is it preparing to drive itself over a cliff like thelma and louise? >> despite the claim that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. >> if congress does nothing, every
numbers. details ahead. >>> meanwhile, washington was abuzz over avoiding the looming fiscal cliff. the president's lunch with mitt romney, the united nations note on palestine. all this as joe biden was christmas shopping. >>> and some amazing random acts of kindness. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. and today the first of the two grand prize powerball winners will come forward to reveal themselves and have their lives change forever. and there's also buzz about a potential code within the winning numbers. nbc's kerry sanders has that story. >> reporter: in tiny dearborn, missouri, where just about everyone knows everyone, the question is was it one of their own who bought a winning powerball ticket? >> it's exciting, very exciting. we never, ever thought that we would sell the winning ticket, and here it is. we did. >> reporter: folks in this farming community just off interstate 70 are now trying to figure out if the winning numbers were chosen with meaning. dearborn is but 35 miles north of kansas city, home of the royals baseball team. those winning lottery numbers? the
are willing to advocate for what is right. i want to talk about that today. i want to -- fiscal cliff, the last time i use that term, because it's not that, but there are serious fiscal issues we should address. i want to talk about a few things we should not be discussing and don't need to talk about and one is social security. social security does not contribute to the deficit. it's not expiring. there's no reason we have to deal with social security right now. it is one of those things that some people who never liked social security, by the way, called it socialism even, want a change and has been wanting to change for decades, so they create this imagery of crisis coming at the end of the year, then what they are trying to do is say, well, we got to change social security because of the so-called fiscal cliff, although it's not really a cliff. so this is something that really shouldn't be on the table. i want to encourage folks to really discuss and get the facts, mr. speaker, because social security is solvent through 2037. doesn't need to be fixed -- does it need to be fixed? y
and that of money. >> you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act, and the future of the republican party on book tv. the senator has written several books including his latest "the debt bomb." join our conversation with your calls, e-mails, tweets, and comments with medical doctor and senator tom coburn. live sunday on c-span 2. >> he worked his way up into harvard law school and then at the urging of his brother in the great western illinois -- immigrated west to illinois, where the lead mining industry was in its heyday. he arrived by stagecoach and train and arrived on steamboat in this muddy mining town. he boarded himself in a log cabin, established a law practice in the log cabin, and slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer. he then got involved politically, ran for congress, serve for eight terms, and then befriended abraham lincoln, obviously from illinois. then ulysses s. grant. as they were on the rise, washburn stayed with them in a close colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, he initially
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10